Green Umbrella in the News

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  • October 14, 2020 1:27 PM | Anonymous

    Press Release                     

    For Immediate Release                                                             

    Rashida Manuel, Director of Public Engagement, Green Umbrella

    Five regional greenspaces are now Greenspace Gems thanks to recognition by Green Umbrella, Greater Cincinnati’s regional sustainability alliance. Scattered across the tri-state area, the gems make up the sixth round of the Greenspace Gems program, which highlights Greater Cincinnati’s abundance of quality protected  landscape.

    The sites named in the current round of Greenspace Gems are: 

    ·       Buttercup Valley Preserve, Hamilton County, OH

    ·       Gunpowder Creek Nature Park, Boone County, KY

    ·       Riverside Natural Area, Butler County, OH

    ·       Batter Bates Woodland, Kenton County, KY

    ·       Kelley Nature Preserve, Clermont County, OH

    “Greater Cincinnati has a wealth of diverse natural environments,” said Green Umbrella executive director, Ryan Mooney-Bullock, “Residents and visitors have access to grassy knolls, forested wetlands and breathtaking riversides all within a relatively short distance from our city center. We’re excited to share the stories behind these beautiful spaces. We encourage our community to get outside and explore some Greenspace Gems this fall and winter, as a safe and fun way to connect with friends and family.”

    Launched in 2018, Greenspace Gems has recognized thirty local properties for their outstanding scenic value, biodiversity, scientific importance or historic interest. Gems are selected by a team of volunteer conservation experts to showcase the region’s variety of unique natural sites. The program strives to tell the stories of these protected places to grow public support for greenspace conservation and the organizations who are leading this work in our region. 

    To aid in storytelling, Green Umbrella is excited to launch a new interactive story map featuring pictures of each designated Greenspace Gem and important facts that make them each truly unique. Visit www.greenumbrella.org/greenspace-gems to learn more about the program, explore the story map and find your next adventure. 

    ###

    Celebrating over 20 years as Greater Cincinnati’s hub for environmental sustainability. Act locally with Green Umbrella and make a difference. Learn more or become a member at www.greenumbrella.org.



  • October 07, 2020 7:56 AM | Anonymous

    Source: Cincinnati Enquirer

    By: Jeanne Houck

    Community leaders recently celebrated the opening of a new half-mile stretch of the Columbia Connector multi-use trail, which links Columbia Township to the Little Miami Scenic Trail.

    “It’s amazing to see it finally open and it couldn’t have come at a better time when everybody is looking for outdoor activities,” David Kubicki, president of the Columbia Township Board of Trustees, said in an email to The Enquirer.

    “Columbia Township worked closely with (Great Parks of Hamilton County) and made a significant financial commitment to the Connector. This will improve the quality of life for our residents and also help the businesses nearby. It doesn’t get any better than that.”

    The newly opened stretch of the Columbia Connector runs west from the Little Miami Scenic Trail at the northern end of the Newtown Road bridge.

    It continues behind the 50 West Brewing Co., May We Help and Carriage House Car Wash, all on Wooster Pike, to Walton Creek Road.

    Great Parks of Hamilton County said in a press release that it is planning the next phase of the Connector, which is to cross Walton Creek Road and eventually turn north toward an intersection with Wooster Pike.

    After that, the release said, Great Parks will coordinate with the Ohio Department of Transportation to extend the Connector further west to the Mariemont branch of the Cincinnati and Hamilton County Public Library.

    The eastern end of the Columbia Connector reaches the Little Miami Scenic Trail near trail access points at Avoca Park and trailhead on Wooster Pike and at the Bass Island Park and trailhead and the Little Miami Golf Center, both on Newtown Road.

    Columbia Connector part of CROWN network

     The Connector is also part of CROWN (Cincinnati Riding or Walking Network) a planned 34-mile urban trail loop around Cincinnati.

    When it is complete, CROWN will connect the Columbia Connector to the Murray Path and Wasson Way, as well as the Ohio River Trail from Lunken Airport to Downtown Cincinnati.

    “Great Parks is committed to leading in the development of our regional trails as we see…with the opening of the first phase of the Columbia Connector,” Great Parks CEO Todd Palmeter said in the Great Parks press release.

    “This extension will further expand the CROWN network, which connects the Little Miami Scenic Trail and communities such as the village of Mariemont. The trail also allows easier access to all that Fifty West Brewing has to offer along Wooster Pike.

    “It is dedicated partnerships with Tri-State Trails, Columbia Township, Ohio Department of Transportation, among others, that make great community projects such as this possible,” Palmeter said.

    Marcus Thompson, president of Great Parks’ Board of Commissioners, said in the release that providing trails for the public is important.

    “Since 2019, trail usage has increased 68 percent,” Thompson said.

    “That’s almost half a million extra visitors since 2019. That shows the importance of trails like this and trails throughout the rest of Great Parks.”

  • October 04, 2020 1:16 PM | Anonymous

    Source: Cincinnati Enquirer

    By: Julia Fair

    This is an installment of reporter Julia Fair's series "By the way, NKY." Here, you'll find what's going on in Northern Kentucky.  

    The leaves are changing, people are adding pumpkin flavors to recipes and you probably swapped out your t-shirts for cozy sweaters. 

    As the season changed, a ton of things are happening in Northern Kentucky. The city of Covington is working to expand internet access to its residents and organizations are promoting voter participation.   

    In this series, By the way, NKY – we focus on some of the good news happening in the region and to fill you in on what's going on in your neighborhoods. 

    If there's something you think should be included, email reporter Julia Fair at jfair@enquirer.com

    By the way, here's what's going on in Northern Kentucky:

    Wifi hotspot hosts needed in Covington 

    The city of Covington is on a mission to place 116 WiFi hotspots throughout the city to give internet access to school kids. 

    The $2.5 million project, called Covington Connect, aims to "smash the digital divide," in the city, according to a press release from the city. The Covington Connect initiative will expand internet access by installing Wi-Fi hotspots throughout the city and giving out free computers to families. The city said it will fund the initiative with up to $1.25 million in CARES Act funding. 

    The city partnered with property owners to install a volleyball-sized device on the outside of their house to create a WiFi hotspot in that area. 

    Now, anyone can volunteer their home or business to host the device.

    If you're interested, email Pete Bales, a consultant hired to coordinate the Covington Connect initiative, at petebales@icloud.com. He can also answer questions.

    Bike or walk with local candidates on the Purple People Bridge 

    Running a political campaign is already stressful. Adding a global pandemic to the mix made it even more difficult for local candidates in Northern Kentucky to connect with neighborhoods. 

    On Oct. 17, candidates vying for positions for a spot on a city council or a mayoral title will get the chance to walk and talk with constituents along the Purple People Bridge. Tri-State Trails will host the event from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., according to a Facebook event.

    Lance Montanez and his daughter, Willow, 4, of Fort Mitchell, walk across the Purple People Bridge from Newport, Ky., to Cincinnati on Tuesday, March 31, 2020.

    Tri-State Trails asked participants to support its Active Transportation Policy Platform which can be found on its website. 

    The Facebook event did not include which candidates agreed to attend. 

    Voter turnout effort got a boost with a grant

    In 2019, The Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce launched an initiative to increase voter turnout. 

    That effort got a boost with a $10,000 grant from the Murray and Agnes Seasongood Good Government Foundation, according to a press release from the chamber. 

    The Horizon Community Funds of Northern Kentucky will manage the funds for the chamber to improve voter turnout. It plans to do that by engaging with infrequent voters and people without internet access.

    Since 2011, voter registration in Northern Kentucky increased by 25 percent. During the 2019 gubernatorial election, voter turnout increased by double digits compared to the 2015 gubernatorial election.  

    COVID-19 Resources for NKY residents 

    Need a COVID-19 test? Here are some helpful links to resources in Northern Kentucky. 

    That's it for this installment of By the way, NKY. Let us know if there's something you think we should include in the next. In the meantime, here are some other ways to keep up with your community:

    • Keep an eye on your local government with us and subscribe to the free daily newsletter that gets sent directly to your inbox every morning. 
    • Download the NKY news app and sign up for alerts to be the first to know about news in your neighborhood

    Julia is the Northern Kentucky government reporter through the Report For America program. Anonymous donors pledged to cover the local donor portion of her grant-funded position with The Enquirer. If you want to support Julia's work, you can donate to her Report For America position at this website or email her editor Carl Weiser at cweiser@cincinna.gannett.com to find out how you can help fund her work. 


  • October 04, 2020 1:15 PM | Anonymous

    Source: The River City News

    The Devou Good Foundation of Northern Kentucky announced a donation of one thousand bike racks and five repair stations to the City of Cincinnati.

    "Until now, cyclists have gotten used to locking their bikes up to whatever they can find,” said Wade Johnston, director of Tri-State Trails, an alliance of community advocates pushing to expand three region’s trails bike networks. “Thanks to the Devou Good Foundation, our region is setting a new standard that you can expect to find secure bike parking at your destination in the urban core."

    The donation will allow for the placement of bicycle racks near local businesses and activity centers, much like Devou Good's previous donation of six hundred bike racks in Covington and Newport.

    "In these times of COVID-19, we're seeing a growing desire from people here in Cincinnati to be outside and riding bikes,” said Derek Bauman, founder of Vision Zero, a strategy adopted by Cincinnati to eliminate all traffic-related deaths and severe injuries, while increasing safe, healthy, equitable mobility for all. “This generous donation from the Devou Good Foundation will go a long way toward supporting bike infrastructure in our city and helping provide easier access to a safe and healthy alternative to car trips."

    Devou Good has also installed a bike repair station at the Kenton County Public Library's Covington branch and another at the foot of the Purple People Bridge in Newport.

    The public is encouraged to submit requests for a bike rack in their neighborhood through local community councils and by completing a brief survey here.


  • October 02, 2020 11:10 AM | Anonymous

    Source: Northern Kentucky Tribune

    October is National Farm to School Month, an annual campaign that celebrates the connections happening across the country between kids, families and their community food systems. This year’s theme is “It Takes A Community to Feed A Community.”

    Green Umbrella’s Greater Cincinnati Regional Food Policy Council (GCRFPC) is celebrating by announcing the launch of Feed Our Future, a Farm to School community health program in our region. Campbell County School District will be part of the initial program.

    The program’s mission is to inspire young minds to make healthy choices about what they eat. Initially created by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health in 2016, Feed Our Future connects schools, homes and communities by providing practical information about sourcing and eating local foods that nourish young students.

    “Over the last year, we have been working with four school districts and numerous community partners to understand what the highest needs are to accelerate the health, education and economic benefits of Farm to School,” said GCRFPC Director, Michaela Oldfield. “The comprehensive Feed our Future program simultaneously addresses many of their needs, and we are excited and grateful for this opportunity to partner with Cuyahoga County to replicate their successes in our region.”

    Thanks to federal funding from the USDA, the Feed Our Future program pilot will initially be available to Green Umbrella’s Farm to School partners including the Campbell County School District, Cincinnati Public Schools, Mount Healthy City School District and West Clermont Local School District and to members of the Unified Purchasing Cooperative of the Ohio River Valley.

    Take the Feed Our Future Pledge and learn more here.

  • October 01, 2020 5:16 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Press Release                                                                                                 

    For Immediate Release  

    For more information contact:

    Anne Schneider

    Local Food Consultant, Green Umbrella

    Anne@greenumbrella.org

    October is National Farm to School Month

    Cincinnati -- October is National Farm to School Month, an annual campaign that celebrates the connections happening across the country between kids, families and their community food systems. This year’s theme is “It Takes A Community to Feed A Community”. To celebrate, on Thursday, October 8 at noon, Green Umbrella, along with farm to school partner organizations in Ohio and Indiana, will bite into local apples for the 2020 Great Lakes Great Apple Crunch. Schools and co-curricular organizations are invited to join in and can download supplemental crunch guides to help find local apples and plan coordinating activities. Registration is available at: https://www.cias.wisc.edu/applecrunch/.

    The simple act of purchasing and crunching into local apples can be done at both home and community settings and demonstrates your appreciation for the community food system,” says Tony Staubach, Educator, 4-H Youth Development at Ohio State University Extension. “The event highlights the many nodes within the food system - such as farmers, harvesters, food hub distributors, school nutrition professionals, educators, garden coordinators, bus drivers and more - responsible for getting food from farm to cafeteria.”

    Green Umbrella’s Greater Cincinnati Regional Food Policy Council (GCRFPC) is celebrating by announcing the launch of Feed Our Future, a Farm to School community health program in our region. The program’s mission is to inspire young minds to make healthy choices about what they eat. Initially created by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health in 2016, Feed Our Future connects schools, homes and communities by providing practical information about sourcing and eating local foods that nourish young students.

    “Over the last year, we have been working with four school districts and numerous community partners to understand what the highest needs are to accelerate the health, education and economic benefits of Farm to School,” said GCRFPC Director, Michaela Oldfield. “The comprehensive Feed our Future program simultaneously addresses many of their needs, and we are excited and grateful for this opportunity to partner with Cuyahoga County to replicate their successes in our region.”

    Thanks to federal funding from the USDA, the Feed Our Future program pilot will initially be available to Green Umbrella’s Farm to School partners including Campbell County School District, Cincinnati Public Schools, Mount Healthy City School District and West Clermont Local School District and to members of the Unified Purchasing Cooperative of the Ohio River Valley. Take the Feed Our Future Pledge and learn more at feedourfuture.org.

    ###

    Celebrating 20 years as Greater Cincinnati’s hub for environmental sustainability. Act locally with Green Umbrella and make a difference. Learn more or become a member at www.greenumbrella.org.


  • October 01, 2020 1:25 PM | Anonymous

    Source: CityBeat

    The Devou Good Foundation — which "partners with local nonprofits to assess the unique needs of communities within Greater Cincinnati" — has donated 1,000 new bike racks and five bike repair stations to the City of Cincinnati to help encourage cycling by providing more parking and DIY repairs. 

    "Until now, cyclists have gotten used to locking their bikes up to whatever they can find,” said Wade Johnston, director of Tri-State Trails cycling and trails advocacy group. “Thanks to the Devou Good Foundation, our region is setting a new standard that you can expect to find secure bike parking at your destination in the urban core."

    The Devou Foundation is committed to making sure the public has the access and infrastructure to use biking as a means of both transportation and recreation. They have previously donated 600 bike racks to Covington and Newport and placed two bike repair stations in Northern Kentucky — one at the Covington Branch of the Kenton County Public Library and one at the Purple People Bridge.

    If you want to request a bike rack in your neighborhood, complete a survey at cincinnati-oh.gov/bikes/contact-us/request-bike-parking/.


  • October 01, 2020 8:42 AM | Anonymous
    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact: Wade Johnston, Director, Tri-State Trails

                  wade@greenumbrella.org or 513.541.1538

    Covington, KY – The Devou Good Foundation of Northern Kentucky has donated 1,000 new bike racks and 5 repair stations to the City of Cincinnati. The donation significantly increases the number of racks and bike parking across Cincinnati. 

     "Until now, cyclists have gotten used to locking their bikes up to whatever they can find,” said Wade Johnston, Director of Tri-State Trails, an alliance of community advocates advancing a vision to connect and expand our region’s trail and bikeway network. “Thanks to the Devou Good Foundation, our region is setting a new standard that you can expect to find secure bike parking at your destination in the urban core."

    Through this donation, the Devou Good Foundation sought to encourage and facilitate bicycling as a viable means of transportation throughout Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, lending to them to place bicycle racks near many local businesses and other activity centers throughout the region.

    "In these times of COVID-19, we're seeing a growing desire from people here in Cincinnati to be outside and riding bikes,” said Derek Bauman, founder of Vision Zero, a strategy adopted by Cincinnati to eliminate all traffic-related deaths and severe injuries, while increasing safe, healthy, equitable mobility for all. “This generous donation from the Devou Good Foundation will go a long way toward supporting bike infrastructure in our city and helping provide easier access to a safe and healthy alternative to car trips."

    The 1,000 Cincinnati racks will add to the Devou Good’s commitment to providing easy access to bicycling as a commute and recreation option. Through this initiative, in 2019 the foundation donated 600 bike racks in Covington and Newport in addition to providing two bike repair stations; one located at the Covington Branch of the Kenton County Public Library and the other located at the foot of the Purple People Bridge in Newport.

    The public is encouraged to submit requests for a bike rack in their neighborhood through local community councils and by completing a brief survey at https://www.cincinnati-oh.gov/bikes/contact-us/request-bike-parking/.


  • September 25, 2020 11:34 AM | Anonymous

    Source: Oxford Observer

    As part of Green Umbrella’s Outdoor Weekend, Three Valley Conservation Trust is hosting a phenology and nature walk from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 26 at the Ruder Nature Preserve.

    The preserve is located at the corner of Bonham Road and Shadowy Hills Drive in Oxford. Parking is available on-site off Shadowy Hills Drive. 

    Green Umbrella is the regional sustainability alliance functioning in Greater Cincinnati with dedicated members, passionate about environmental awareness and preservation. The Great Outdoor Weekend is an annual event hosted by Green Umbrella, in which people can participate in more than 100 outdoor recreational events and nature awareness activities. 

    This free event welcomes guests to join tour guides Suellen and Adrianne to learn more about the study of phenology, or the seasonal natural phenomenon which includes the changes in plant and animal life. 

    Due to COVID-19, tours will be socially distant and everyone is required to be masked at all times.

    The preserve’s new boardwalk, where the event will be starting, is wheelchair and stroller accessible. Donations are appreciated, but not mandatory. For more details, check out the conservation trust’s website or call (513) 524-2150. 

  • September 19, 2020 11:24 AM | Anonymous

    Source: Northern Kentucky Tribune

    From families to outdoor enthusiasts, this year’s Great Outdoor Week has something for everyone. Redesigned with safety in mind in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the outdoor sampler will span nine days this year, Sept. 19-27, at venues throughout Greater Cincinnati. At this year’s event participants can explore a Greenspace Gem, bike or hike on one (or more) of the region’s trails or enjoy nature programming at some of the top outdoor outlets Greater Cincinnati has to offer.

    “The outdoors are open,” said Ryan Mooney-Bullock, executive director of Green Umbrella, the region’s environmental sustainability alliance. “With essential measures like wearing a mask and physical distancing when around others, it’s safe and beneficial to get outside and enjoy the beauty that our region’s outdoor spaces have to offer. This year especially, Great Outdoor Week offers families and individuals alike a much-needed respite from being cooped up inside.” 


    To encourage safety, events will be spread out over nine days to decrease crowds while accommodating the 10,000 people who participate annually. Programming includes a wide variety of both in-person events and self-guided activities designed to highlight the region’s outdoor recreation venues, many of which have faced major challenges with the cancellation of revenue-generating programming. Participants can utilize an interactive map to identify participating locations to explore or structured programs and events in which to participate.

    Additionally, this year’s programming also includes Breakfast on the Bridge, a staple event for bicycle enthusiasts to celebrate National Bike to Work Day on Sept. 25 from 7-9 a.m.

    “More people are out biking than ever before,” said Wade Johnston, director of Tri-State Trails at Green Umbrella. “Even if you’re not biking to work, we encourage you to change up your ‘new normal’ commute and celebrate all things bicycling with us on the Purple People Bridge.”

    Great Outdoor Week happens in conjunction with National Public Lands Day on Sept. 26, which celebrates environmental stewardship annually. To participate, attendees can visit a Greenspace Gem, one of 30 protected greenspaces recognized by Green Umbrella for its unique natural qualities. Often protected as the result of public will, these areas range from a once contaminated uranium processing plant to an urban gem that offers city-dwellers a chance to see a variety of wildlife right in the city center.

    Great Outdoor Week is made possible by generous sponsorships from the Cincinnati Wild Flower Preservation Society, Cincinnati Magazine and others. For more information on how to join in the fun click here to locate an event and here for an interactive map. 


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