Green Umbrella in the News

  • October 01, 2020 1:25 PM | Anonymous

    Source: CityBeat

    The Devou Good Foundation — which "partners with local nonprofits to assess the unique needs of communities within Greater Cincinnati" — has donated 1,000 new bike racks and five bike repair stations to the City of Cincinnati to help encourage cycling by providing more parking and DIY repairs. 

    "Until now, cyclists have gotten used to locking their bikes up to whatever they can find,” said Wade Johnston, director of Tri-State Trails cycling and trails advocacy group. “Thanks to the Devou Good Foundation, our region is setting a new standard that you can expect to find secure bike parking at your destination in the urban core."

    The Devou Foundation is committed to making sure the public has the access and infrastructure to use biking as a means of both transportation and recreation. They have previously donated 600 bike racks to Covington and Newport and placed two bike repair stations in Northern Kentucky — one at the Covington Branch of the Kenton County Public Library and one at the Purple People Bridge.

    If you want to request a bike rack in your neighborhood, complete a survey at cincinnati-oh.gov/bikes/contact-us/request-bike-parking/.


  • October 01, 2020 8:42 AM | Anonymous
    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact: Wade Johnston, Director, Tri-State Trails

                  wade@greenumbrella.org or 513.541.1538

    Covington, KY – The Devou Good Foundation of Northern Kentucky has donated 1,000 new bike racks and 5 repair stations to the City of Cincinnati. The donation significantly increases the number of racks and bike parking across Cincinnati. 

     "Until now, cyclists have gotten used to locking their bikes up to whatever they can find,” said Wade Johnston, Director of Tri-State Trails, an alliance of community advocates advancing a vision to connect and expand our region’s trail and bikeway network. “Thanks to the Devou Good Foundation, our region is setting a new standard that you can expect to find secure bike parking at your destination in the urban core."

    Through this donation, the Devou Good Foundation sought to encourage and facilitate bicycling as a viable means of transportation throughout Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, lending to them to place bicycle racks near many local businesses and other activity centers throughout the region.

    "In these times of COVID-19, we're seeing a growing desire from people here in Cincinnati to be outside and riding bikes,” said Derek Bauman, founder of Vision Zero, a strategy adopted by Cincinnati to eliminate all traffic-related deaths and severe injuries, while increasing safe, healthy, equitable mobility for all. “This generous donation from the Devou Good Foundation will go a long way toward supporting bike infrastructure in our city and helping provide easier access to a safe and healthy alternative to car trips."

    The 1,000 Cincinnati racks will add to the Devou Good’s commitment to providing easy access to bicycling as a commute and recreation option. Through this initiative, in 2019 the foundation donated 600 bike racks in Covington and Newport in addition to providing two bike repair stations; one located at the Covington Branch of the Kenton County Public Library and the other located at the foot of the Purple People Bridge in Newport.

    The public is encouraged to submit requests for a bike rack in their neighborhood through local community councils and by completing a brief survey at https://www.cincinnati-oh.gov/bikes/contact-us/request-bike-parking/.


  • September 25, 2020 11:34 AM | Anonymous

    Source: Oxford Observer

    As part of Green Umbrella’s Outdoor Weekend, Three Valley Conservation Trust is hosting a phenology and nature walk from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 26 at the Ruder Nature Preserve.

    The preserve is located at the corner of Bonham Road and Shadowy Hills Drive in Oxford. Parking is available on-site off Shadowy Hills Drive. 

    Green Umbrella is the regional sustainability alliance functioning in Greater Cincinnati with dedicated members, passionate about environmental awareness and preservation. The Great Outdoor Weekend is an annual event hosted by Green Umbrella, in which people can participate in more than 100 outdoor recreational events and nature awareness activities. 

    This free event welcomes guests to join tour guides Suellen and Adrianne to learn more about the study of phenology, or the seasonal natural phenomenon which includes the changes in plant and animal life. 

    Due to COVID-19, tours will be socially distant and everyone is required to be masked at all times.

    The preserve’s new boardwalk, where the event will be starting, is wheelchair and stroller accessible. Donations are appreciated, but not mandatory. For more details, check out the conservation trust’s website or call (513) 524-2150. 

  • September 19, 2020 11:24 AM | Anonymous

    Source: Northern Kentucky Tribune

    From families to outdoor enthusiasts, this year’s Great Outdoor Week has something for everyone. Redesigned with safety in mind in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the outdoor sampler will span nine days this year, Sept. 19-27, at venues throughout Greater Cincinnati. At this year’s event participants can explore a Greenspace Gem, bike or hike on one (or more) of the region’s trails or enjoy nature programming at some of the top outdoor outlets Greater Cincinnati has to offer.

    “The outdoors are open,” said Ryan Mooney-Bullock, executive director of Green Umbrella, the region’s environmental sustainability alliance. “With essential measures like wearing a mask and physical distancing when around others, it’s safe and beneficial to get outside and enjoy the beauty that our region’s outdoor spaces have to offer. This year especially, Great Outdoor Week offers families and individuals alike a much-needed respite from being cooped up inside.” 


    To encourage safety, events will be spread out over nine days to decrease crowds while accommodating the 10,000 people who participate annually. Programming includes a wide variety of both in-person events and self-guided activities designed to highlight the region’s outdoor recreation venues, many of which have faced major challenges with the cancellation of revenue-generating programming. Participants can utilize an interactive map to identify participating locations to explore or structured programs and events in which to participate.

    Additionally, this year’s programming also includes Breakfast on the Bridge, a staple event for bicycle enthusiasts to celebrate National Bike to Work Day on Sept. 25 from 7-9 a.m.

    “More people are out biking than ever before,” said Wade Johnston, director of Tri-State Trails at Green Umbrella. “Even if you’re not biking to work, we encourage you to change up your ‘new normal’ commute and celebrate all things bicycling with us on the Purple People Bridge.”

    Great Outdoor Week happens in conjunction with National Public Lands Day on Sept. 26, which celebrates environmental stewardship annually. To participate, attendees can visit a Greenspace Gem, one of 30 protected greenspaces recognized by Green Umbrella for its unique natural qualities. Often protected as the result of public will, these areas range from a once contaminated uranium processing plant to an urban gem that offers city-dwellers a chance to see a variety of wildlife right in the city center.

    Great Outdoor Week is made possible by generous sponsorships from the Cincinnati Wild Flower Preservation Society, Cincinnati Magazine and others. For more information on how to join in the fun click here to locate an event and here for an interactive map. 


  • September 18, 2020 11:17 AM | Anonymous

    By: Timyka Artist

    Source: WCPO 9

    CINCINNATI — The COVID-19 pandemic hasn't been all that bad for some Tri-State students and teachers.

    Students at James N. Gamble Montessori High School haven’t returned to the classroom just yet, but they are successfully making the shift to outdoor learning through agricultural sciences.


    Students in the farm-to-school program are learning the ways of farming in the middle of the city. Planting, harvesting and later eating crops like arugula, asparagus, mustard greens, rhubarb and more.

    Mary Dudley runs the school’s food sciences program. She has her largest class ever this year.

    “I think of it as a social justice issue as students really need to know what they are eating, where food comes from and how they can contribute to a sustainable future,” Dudley said.

    According to Dudley, 111 students have enrolled. Even before virtual and outdoor learning became the standard, principal Taylor Porter said Gamble Montessori was well ahead of the game with a program in full bloom.

    “We've already been running outdoor classrooms, nurseries and gardens, and a lot of the farm skills that people are interested in right now that's already embedded in the culture of our schools,” Porter said.

    Students are also sent home with starter kits to grow beans from home. No class time required.

    “That love of learning the outdoors and seeing the outdoors is not only a place of relaxation but a place of exploration," Dudley said.

    Director of the Greater Cincinnati Regional Food Policy Counci Michaela Oldfield said lessons about healthy eating habits are best served when kids are young.

    “If 10% of our regional population shifted about 10% of their food budget to purchasing local, it translates to a $66 million investment in our local economy,” Oldfield said.

    And that, she said, is a win-win -- not only for the farming community but for students who score higher on standardized tests when enrolled in Farm-to-School programs like these.

    “I think it's really important to continually educate them about healthy food choices. Then if they have the opportunity to grow their own you can't get much better and fresher than that," Dudley said.

    Green Umbrella is hosting a virtual workshop Saturday, September 19 to show educators how to bring farm-to-school programs to their classrooms.




  • September 15, 2020 11:14 AM | Anonymous

    By: Movers and Makers

    Source: Movers and Makers

    It’s a great week to get back to nature, whether human or manatee.

    Get outside during Great Outdoor Week!

    From families to outdoor enthusiasts, this year’s Great Outdoor Week has something for everyone. Redesigned with safety in mind, in light of the COVID pandemic, the outdoor sampler will span nine days this year, September 19-27, at venues throughout Greater Cincinnati. At this year’s event participants can explore a Greenspace Gem, bike or hike on one (or more) of the region’s trails, or enjoy nature programming at some of the top outdoor outlets Greater Cincinnati has to offer. 


    Rowe Woods, Cincinnati Nature Center

    “The outdoors are open!” said Ryan Mooney-Bullock, executive director of Green Umbrella, the region’s environmental sustainability alliance. “With essential measures like wearing a mask and physical distancing when around others, it’s safe and beneficial to get outside and enjoy the beauty that our region’s outdoor spaces have to offer. This year especially, Great Outdoor Week offers families and individuals alike a much needed respite from being cooped up inside.” 

    This year’s programming includes a wide variety of both in-person events and self-guided activities for people of all ages designed to highlight the region’s outdoor recreation venues, many of which have faced major challenges with the cancellation of revenue-generating programming. Generally, Great Outdoor Weekend sees crowds of 10,000 people at locations around the region. The event will look different in this its 17th year.

    Participants can utilize an interactive map to identify participating locations to explore or, if interested, structured programs and events in which to participate. 

    Additionally, this year’s programming also includes Breakfast on the Bridge – Friday, September 25 – a staple event for bicycle enthusiasts to celebrate National Bike to Work Day. From 7 to 9 a.m., bicyclists can bring-your-own breakfast to the Purple People Bridge and grab a free coffee.

    “More people are out biking than ever before,” said Wade Johnston, director of Tri-State Trails at Green Umbrella. “Even if you’re not biking to work, we encourage you to change up your ‘new normal’ commute and celebrate all things bicycling with us on the Purple People Bridge.”

    As always, Great Outdoor Week happens in conjunction with National Public Lands Day on September 26. The nation’s largest single-day volunteer effort, each year NPLD celebrates greenspace by encouraging environmental stewardship. In Greater Cincinnati, attendees can celebrate by visiting a Greenspace Gem, one of 30 protected areas recognized by Green Umbrella for its unique natural qualities. These areas range from a once contaminated uranium processing plant to an urban gem that offers city-dwellers a chance to see a variety of wildlife right in the city center. 

    Information: greatoutdoorweekend.org 
    Interactive map: tristatetrails.org/explore 



  • September 08, 2020 11:12 AM | Anonymous

    By: CityBeat Staff

    Source: CityBeat

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    This year's Great Outdoor Weekend has expanded to encompass nine days of nature-focused fun, transforming into Great Outdoor Week. 

    Hosted by the Green Umbrella regional sustainability alliance, from Sept. 19-27, venues across the area will be offering special free programming for the initiative, which aims to encourage adults and kids to "sample the best outdoor recreation and nature awareness programs available."

    “The outdoors are open!” said Ryan Mooney-Bullock, executive director of Green Umbrella, in a release. “With essential measures like wearing a mask and physical distancing when around others, it’s safe and beneficial to get outside and enjoy the beauty that our region’s outdoor spaces have to offer. This year especially, Great Outdoor Week offers families and individuals alike a much-needed respite from being cooped up inside.” 

    The expansion from one weekend to a full nine days will create more spaced-out and socially distant opportunities for the 10,000 people who participate in the Great Outdoor Weekend each year. 

    Activities include "a wide variety of both in-person events and self-guided activities designed to highlight the region’s outdoor recreation venues, many of which have faced major challenges with the cancellation of revenue-generating programming," says Green Umbrella. 

    You can bike, hike or explore area nature trails or visit one of Green Umbrella's Greenspace Gems, natural areas picked by a team of conservation experts that help tell the story of the region's biodiversity, including a special focus on geology, plant life and history. These 30 protected spaces "range from a once-contaminated uranium processing plant to an urban gem that offers city-dwellers a chance to see a variety of wildlife right in the city center," says the organization.

    A full list of 2020 Great Outdoor Week events can be found at greatoutdoorweekend.org and includes a Raptor Inc. bird sanctuary open house, Native American tales by campfire at the Caldwell Nature Preserve and a special Breakfast on the Bridge 7-9 a.m. Sept. 25 on the Purple People Bridge to celebrate biking and cycling commuters.

    National Bike to Work Day, generally held in May, was scheduled for Sept. 25 and Tri-State Trails bike advocacy group director Wade Johnston says, "More people are out biking than ever before. Even if you’re not biking to work, we encourage you to change up your ‘new normal’ commute and celebrate all things bicycling with us on the Purple People Bridge.”

    This year, however, you will have to pack your own breakfast due to COVID safety precautions.

    Great Outdoor Week takes place Sept. 19-27 and includes tons of free nature activities for both kids and adults to enjoy. More info: greatoutdoorweekend.org.


  • August 31, 2020 4:39 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Press Release For Immediate Release

    For more information contact:

    Ryan Mooney-Bullock, ryan@greenumbrella.org,
    513.633.5823, Executive Director, Green Umbrella

    Get Outside During Great Outdoor Week!

    From families to outdoor enthusiasts, this year’s Great Outdoor Week has something for everyone. Redesigned with safety in mind in light of the COVID pandemic, the outdoor sampler will span 9 days this year, September 19-27, at venues throughout Greater Cincinnati. At this year’s event participants can explore a Greenspace Gem, bike or hike on one (or more) of the region’s trails or enjoy nature programming at some of the top outdoor outlets Greater Cincinnati has to offer. 

    “The outdoors are open!” declared Ryan Mooney-Bullock, executive director of Green Umbrella, the region’s environmental sustainability alliance. “With essential measures like wearing a mask and physical distancing when around others, it’s safe and beneficial to get outside and enjoy the beauty that our region’s outdoor spaces have to offer. This year especially, Great Outdoor Week offers families and individuals alike a much needed respite from being cooped up inside.” 

    In an effort to encourage safety, this year’s programming includes a wide variety of both in-person events and self-guided activities for people of all ages designed to highlight the region’s outdoor recreation venues, many of which have faced major challenges with the cancellation of revenue-generating programming. Generally, Great Outdoor Weekend sees crowds of 10,000 people at locations around the region. The event will look different in its 17th year. Events will be spread out over 9 days to decrease crowds while still accommodating the high number of curious nature lovers eager to take part. Participants can utilize an interactive map to identify participating locations to explore or, if interested, structured programs and events in which to participate. 

    Additionally, this year’s programming also includes Breakfast on the Bridge, a staple event for bicycle enthusiasts to celebrate National Bike to Work Day on Friday, September 25. Between 7-9 AM, bicyclists can bring-your-own breakfast to the Purple People Bridge and grab a free coffee. “More people are out biking than ever before,” said Wade Johnston, director of Tri-State Trails at Green Umbrella. “Even if you’re not biking to work, we encourage you to change up your ‘new normal’ commute and celebrate all things bicycling with us on the Purple People Bridge.”

    As always, Great Outdoor Week happens in conjunction with National Public Lands Day on September 26. The nation’s largest single-day volunteer effort, each year NPLD celebrates greenspace by encouraging environmental stewardship. In Greater Cincinnati, attendees can celebrate by visiting a Greenspace Gem, one of 30 protected greenspaces recognized by Green Umbrella for its unique natural qualities. Often protected as the result of public will, these areas range from a once contaminated uranium processing plant to an urban gem that offers city-dwellers a chance to see a variety of wildlife right in the city center. 

    Great Outdoor Week is made possible by generous sponsorships from the Cincinnati Wild Flower Preservation Society, Cincinnati Magazine and others. 

    For more information on how to join in the fun visit www.greatoutdoorweekend.org to locate an event and https://tristatetrails.org/explore/ for an interactive map. 



  • August 31, 2020 11:10 AM | Anonymous

    By: Fox19 Digital Staff

    Source: Fox19

    CINCINNATI (FOX19) - Whether students return to full-time in-person learning or a blend of remote and classroom instruction, Cincinnati AAA says transportation will undoubtedly be impacted, affecting not only school districts, students, and parents but motorists on the roads.

    “For everyone’s sake, especially our young students, be alert for changing traffic patterns, slow down, and don’t drive distracted,” says Jennifer Moore, AAA spokeswoman.

    AAA offers the following traffic safety tips as schools begin to reopen:

    Drop-Off/Pick-Up

    • Follow school drop-off and pick-up procedures.
    • Don’t double park, it blocks visibility for other children and vehicles.
    • Don’t load or unload children across the street from the school.
    • Have children exit the vehicle on the “curb side” every time (so they aren’t opening the car door into an oncoming traffic lane or crossing around the front/back of car to get to curb)
    • Slow down, eliminate distractions, and watch for children

    School Bus Safety

    • Always Stop for School Buses – Flashing yellow lights on a school bus indicate it is preparing to stop to load or unload children and motorists should slow down and prepare to stop. Red flashing lights and extended stop arms indicate the bus has stopped and children are getting on and off. Motorists are required to stop their vehicles and wait until the red lights stop flashing, the extended stop sign is withdrawn and the bus begins moving before they can start driving again.
    • Keep Track of Time – Be aware of the time of day you’re on the road and how that coincides with the school day. More school-age pedestrians are killed from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. and from 3 to 4 p.m. than any other hours of the day.
    • Slow Down – Whether in a school zone or residential neighborhood, drivers should keep their speed low and be prepared to stop quickly for increased vehicle or pedestrian traffic.
    • Come to a complete stop -- Always come to a complete stop, checking carefully for children on sidewalks and in crosswalks before proceeding.
    • Eliminate distractions--Research shows that taking your eyes off the road for just two seconds doubles your chances of crashing. Children can be quick, crossing the road unexpectedly or emerging suddenly between two parked cars. Reduce risk by not using your cell phone while driving.
    • Obey Traffic Signs – Unfortunately, many motorists violate stop signs in school zones and residential neighborhoods –many failing to come to a complete stop, rolling through a stop sign or not slowing down at all.

    Pedestrian Safety

    • Cross only at corners so drivers can see you. Never cross between parked cars or mid-block.
    • Use a crosswalk when it’s available. Don’t assume that because you can see the driver, the driver can see you. Always use caution when crossing.
    • Look all ways before crossing. Look and listen for cars, pedestrians and bicyclists.
    • Cross right when the light turns green so you have time to cross safely.
    • Use the crosswalk push-button signal when possible, and cross when the signal allows.
    • Watch for cars that are turning left or right when you are crossing.
    • Walk on a sidewalk when it is provided. If you must walk in the street, walk facing traffic, on the left side of the road and as far to the left as possible.
    • Make it easy for drivers to see you – dress in light colors, wear reflective material or use a flashlight.
    • Remove headphones and don’t use cell phones or electronic devices when crossing the street.
    • Watch for white lights on vehicles signaling backing up in driveways or parking lots.
    • Avoid walking alone. Walk with a friend.
    Bicycle Safety
    • Make sure your child has the skills to ride a bike safely, such as riding in a straight line and signaling to vehicles when turning.
    • Choose the safest route to bike to school, one with less traffic and slower speeds. Use bike paths if they are available.
    • Make sure your cyclists understand traffic safety rules, such as riding in the same direction as traffic and stopping at all stop signs and signals.
    • Explain the importance of wearing a bike helmet to your child. They’re critical to minimizing injury in case of a crash. According to the Insurance Institute of Highway Safety, wearing a helmet can reduce the odds of head injury by half.
    • Ride focused and alert. Never use earbuds or electronics while riding.
    • Tri-State Trails has a comprehensive map of trails and on-road bike lanes that parents can use to choose a route. tristatetrails.org/find-a-trail.
    • Use bike lights if you are riding when it is still dark out early in the morning. Use a flashing white light in front and a flashing red light in the rear.
    • Bring a lock so you can secure your bike when you arrive at school.

    “No matter the plan, no matter the mode of transportation, everyone needs to remain vigilant – put down the phone, look up, and pay attention to help local students get to and from school safely,” says Moore.


  • August 31, 2020 11:07 AM | Anonymous

    By: CityBeat Staff

    Source CityBeat

    Neighborhood leaders, nonprofit groups and Cincinnati elected officials Saturday unveiled a .6 mile stretch of bike and walking path on the southern edge of Lower Price Hill.

    That swath of pavement, part of the planned Ohio River West Trail, could someday allow Price Hill residents to ride the roughly two and a half miles downtown in a matter of minutes — a key, non-automotive link between the West Side and the city's core, Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley says.

    The path between Evans Street and State Avenue is also part of more ambitious plans. Supporters hope that, over the next decade, the Ohio River West Trail will eventually stretch 26 miles all the way to Shawnee Lookout Park, which sits on Ohio's border with Indiana. And more progress to the east could take riders all the way to the Loveland Bike Trail someday.

    The short path is also a key link in a proposed 34-mile network of paths and lanes connecting Cincinnati called CROWN, or Cincinnati Riding Or Walking Network.

    Nonprofit trail advocacy group Tri-State Trails has been instrumental in envisioning and promoting CROWN. Director Wade Johnston says the path is a key part of that much larger plan.

    "It's a part of a bigger vision," Johnston says. "Last year, the city opened a four-tenths of a mile segment at Gilday-Riverside Park, and the city just got started on another piece that will come east from Gilday to Fairbanks Avenue."

    That 1.3 mile section, which runs to Sedamsville, is already underway.

    "We're working to connect those two segments and connect this trail to downtown," Johnston said. "We're (also) trying to a create 34-mile trail loop around the city that will link up the Ohio River Trail, the Wasson Way Trail, the Mill Creek Trail and the Little Miami Trail."

    CROWN could create myriad new mobility options, boosters say, especially in neighborhoods that don't have high levels of car ownership.

    Despite the progress on that trail and others like Wasson Way, frustration remains among some bike supporters, mostly around the slow pace of bike infrastructure improvement and the lack of bike lanes in the city.

    In 2010, Cincinnati City Council passed a citywide,15-year bike plan that called for 350 miles of bike lanes around the city. But Mayor John Cranley, who took office in 2013, much prefers bike trails, and the city's administration has generally prioritized the latter. Thus, only a tiny fraction of those 350 miles of lanes have been completed.

    The city applied for federal grants to fund the Lower Price Hill bike path in 2014, and just completed the project this month.

    The debate about the pace and trajectory of Cincinnati's bike infrastructure hasn't gone away. Department of Transportation and Engineering Interim Director John Brazina last year presented an update on the city's bike program. That update calls for completion of more paths and trails, but also highlights the funding challenges inherent in installing the more expensive off-street infrastructure, which can cost between $1 million and $3 million a mile.

    On-street bike lanes are much cheaper, supporters say — about $2,000 a mile. They cost even less when roads are already being repaved by the city. Further, bike lanes are vital in some parts of the city that aren't well-served by bike paths but need better accessibility options, according to lane advocates. Those lanes can help bike commuters who may live in lower-income areas and may not have cars get to work, for example.

    Cranley has said bike paths or trails are safer, as they're not on the streets, and allow for a diversity of uses.

    Despite the debate, neighborhood leaders in Lower Price Hill say they're excited about their new bike path.

    Lower Price Hill Community Council President Cynthia Ford said she was initially taken aback by coverage describing how short the path is.

    "The more I thought about it, I realized that every good thing has to start somewhere," she said. "And what better place than Lower Price Hill?"

    Ford says the path will complement community development efforts in the neighborhood, including a new affordable housing initiative called Price Hill Thrives and a nonprofit grocery store currently in the works.

    "It's absolutely perfect that the Ohio River Trail West should launch here in Lower Price Hill," she said.



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